Tag Archives: Lynette Eason

Review: When a Secret Kills, by Lynette Eason

When A Secret Kills, by Lynette EasonWhen a Secret Kills, by Lynette Eason (Revell, 2013)

Three friends, separated the night of their high school graduation. Alexia left town as planned, to escape her troubled home life. Serena went on to university. Jillian fled, terrified by something she’d witnessed—a secret that could still kill her ten years later.

In fact, the danger’s mounting. Her enemies have discovered her new identity. She can’t let them find out about her daughter.

Jillian returns to her hometown to find the evidence needed to convict a prominent citizen of murder. Finding that evidence will mean working with Colton Brady, nephew of the murderer. Colton is also her former boyfriend, hurt that she didn’t say goodbye, and unaware that he has a daughter.

This is another fast-paced read to complete the series, and it delivers some satisfying twists.

When a Secret Kills is book 3 in the Deadly Reunions series, and while each one can be read as a stand-alone, there are spoilers for the previous books so they’re best read in order.

Lynette Eason is a multi-published author and a trusted name in Christian suspense. For more about the author and her books, visit lynetteeason.com.

[Review copy from the public library.]

Review: When a Heart Stops, by Lynette Eason

When a Heart Stops, by Lynette Eason. Deadly Reunions book 2. #Christianfiction #romanticsuspenseWhen a Heart Stops, by Lynette Eason (Revell, 2012)

Work becomes personal for Medical Examiner Serena Hopkins when she realizes the victims of a copycat serial killer are all members of her high school graduating class. Tension grows as the killer (or killers) seem to be stalking Serena herself.

Meanwhile, she’s also being targeted by someone who wants documents she’s been entrusted with by her friend Jillian, who vanished at graduation after witnessing something too terrifying to share with her friends.

Serena must work with the local police—and with high school crush, FBI agent Dominic Allen—to find clues to end this new string of deaths.

When a Heart Stops is book 2 in the Deadly Reunions series, and it’s another strong read. Because the crimes in this book are more disturbing (although not graphic), I found parts of it harder to read. As in book 1, When the Smoke Clears, this is a stand-alone novel that also points toward the mystery of why Jillian disappeared.

Lynette Eason is a multi-published author and a trusted name in Christian suspense. For more about the author and her books, visit lynetteeason.com.

[Review copy from the public library.]

Review: When the Smoke Clears, by Lynette Eason

When the Smoke Clears, by Lynette EasonWhen the Smoke Clears, by Lynette Eason (Revell, 2012)

Alexia, Serena, and Jillian were inseperable until high school graduation—when Jillian fled, terrified by something she couldn’t tell even her closest friends. Alexia left too, desperate to get away from an abusive home life. Serena and Alexia kept in touch over the years, but neither of them know how to find Jillian.

Now, ten years after graduation, Alexia nearly dies fighting a fire—because her equipment was sabotaged. While she’s off work, she decides to go home to visit Serena… and face her estranged mother, since the woman is in hospital.

Can her mother really have changed, like Serena says? And what’s with Serena, Alexia’s mother, and even Hunter Graham (last seen making eyes at her at graduation, now a handsome-and-single cop in town) telling Alexia that God loves her? That He thinks she’s worth something?

More urgently, who keeps trying to attack her? And why?

When the Smoke Clears is a thriller first, with romantic and spiritual sub-plots. It’s also book 1 in the Deadly Reunions series, and while this book’s main plot resolves satisfactorily, the man who’s after Jillian is only getting more desperate. And Alexia’s and Serena’s lives may still be in danger.

Definitely a series I want to keep reading.

Lynette Eason is a multi-published author and a trusted name in Christian suspense. For more about the author and her books, visit lynetteeason.com.

[Review copy from my personal library.]

Review: Always Watching, by Lynette Eason

Always Watching, by Lynette Eason. Elite Guardians book 1, romantic suspenseAlways Watching, by Lynette Eason (Revell, 2016)

Olivia Edwards is an expert bodyguard, but when she’s thrust into the key role in guarding psychologist Dr. Wade Savage from an obsessive stalker, the personal walls she’s built start to crumble.

Olivia must keep Wade and his daughter, Amy, safe and maintain a professional distance even as she and Wade discover a strong mutual attraction. But Wade and Amy’s faith may help her find her way back to God.

Always Watching is a fast-paced, enjoyable read, with a bit of a twist at the end. The characters are likeable, and it’s far too easy to keep reading “just one more chapter.”

Lynette Eason is a multi-published author of Christian romantic suspense. Always Watching is book 1 in her four-book Elite Guardians series. For more about the author and her books, visit lynetteeason.com.

[Review copy from my personal library.]

Review: Sins of the Past, by Dee Henderson, Dani Pettrey, and Lynette Eason

Sins of the Past, by Dee Henderson, Dani Pettrey, and Lynette EasonSins of the Past, by Dee Henderson, Dani Pettrey and Lynette Eason (Bethany House, 2016)

Three romantic suspense novellas in one book, from three of the top Christian writers in the genre: Sins of the Past delivers shorter, but still satisfying, reads.

Stories feature a cop whose mother has gone missing, a competitive swimmer who may be a killer’s next target, and a paramedic who’s in danger because of an accident she can’t remember. In each case, the present crisis comes from something that happened in the characters’ past (hence the title).

Fans of Dani Pettrey’s Alaskan Courage series will be pleased to step back to the 70s to meet the McKenna clan’s parents. The other two stories take place in the present.

I’m not usually fond of shorter fiction, but these novellas contain enough depth that they feel complete. There’s no sense of being rushed or short-changed on plot or characters.

Readers of Christian romantic suspense will definitely want to grab a copy of Sins of the Past. For more about the book and its authors, and to read an excerpt, see the publisher’s website.

[Book has been provided courtesy of Baker Publishing Group and Graf-Martin Communications, Inc. Available at your favourite bookseller from Bethany House, a division of Baker Publishing Group.]

Review: No One to Trust, by Lynette Eason

No One to Trust, by Lynette Eason

No One to Trust, by Lynette Eason (Revell, 2014)

Summer Abernathy wakes up one morning to find her husband missing, three men in her home intent on finding him, and the life she’s been living based on a lie. Which Kyle Abernathy did she marry? The computer programmer she met in line at the bank? Or the one who was apparently using that image as a cover? (From the publisher’s website)

Kyle Abernathy is really David Hackett, living undercover in hopes the Witness Security program can keep him alive long enough to testify at a high-profile trial that’s only months away now. The mob wasn’t supposed to find him – never supposed to threaten Summer.

No One to Trust is a fast-paced thriller as Kyle/David and Summer try to outrun their enemies and to discover if one of the US Marshalls helping them is secretly feeding updates to the other side. Their safety comes down to the skills David learned in the military and to the help of his most trusted friends.

Complicating the story is the broken trust between Summer and David – when the one thing Summer told him in the beginning is that she couldn’t handle lies because of her past. Now her whole marriage is based on a lie, but she can’t leave him because his enemies have become hers.

The full identity of Ron, one of David’s friends, isn’t explained, and I hope this means he’ll show up in his own story. Or perhaps he has in a previous novel.

Lynette Eason has crafted a taut suspense novel with an ordinary heroine and some chilling antagonists. David has changed a lot during his time as Kyle. For one thing, he’s become a Christian. For another, he’s truly fallen in love with the woman he married for cover. Now, if he lives, it looks like he’ll lose her because of his lies.

Moments of the story pushed fairly close to the edge of my comfort level, but never passed it. No One to Trust is a good read that you won’t want to put down.

Lynette Eason www.lynetteeason.com is a bestselling author of Christian romantic suspense. To read an excerpt of No One to Trust, Hidden Identity #1, visit the publisher’s website. The next novel in the Hidden Identity series is Nowhere to Turn.

[Review copy from the public library.]

Review: Too Close to Home, by Lynette Eason

Too Close to Home, by Lynette Eason (Revell, April 2010)

Connor Wolfe is the lead detective on a team dedicated to solving—and stopping—a string of abductions. Each victim is a teen girl, and so far three of them have turned up dead. Connor has a personal stake in this case as well: his 16-year-old daughter, Jenna, fits the victims’ age range.

FBI Special Agent Samantha Cash is the forensic computer genius who may be their only hope to crack this case. When she finds evidence that the girls have been lured by an online predator, the killer starts a war of intimidation.

As if things weren’t complicated enough, Connor and Samantha each have family concerns pulling at them. And they can’t stop thinking about one another, despite Samantha’s vow to never date a cop. (Connor is a widower.)

I appreciate the main characters’ depth, and the honest way they wrestle with their faith in relation to the tragedies in their pasts and present. The novel has a good balance between characters and plot, and both deliver the reader to a satisfying ending.

Lynette Eason pulls off a taut romantic suspense novel that’s on the intense end of the suspense scale. I didn’t find it scary, but there were times I needed to put it down and catch my breath. It never stayed down for long.

I would have liked to see a bit more resolution to the fallout from the crimes. Rather than spoil the plot, I’ll just say not all parties were accounted for at the end. But that’s a curiosity issue more than anything else.

The novel’s epilogue sets up the next story and plants a serious worry in the reader’s mind. A worry we’ll have to wait until October 2010 to satisfy, when book 2 in the “Women of Justice” series comes out.

Too Close to Home is a well-crafted novel, but you don’t have to take my word for it. Dee Henderson gave it a positive endorsement, and her own best-selling romantic suspense novels prove she knows a thing or two about the genre.

Too Close to Home is Lynette Eason’s eighth novel. You can read an excerpt here or if you’ve already read the novel, check out the discussion questions here.  You can learn more about Lynette at her website, and she’s promised to stop by this blog for an interview some Friday soon.

Note: Review copy provided courtesy of Baker Publishing Group and Graf-Martin Communications, Inc. in exchange for an honest review. Too Close to Home is available now at your local Christian retailer.